Winter Sports Health & Safety Update

December 2010

In August 2009, based upon the recommendation of the Risk Management Advisory Panel and Health and

Safety Committee, Item 3 of the
Winter Sports Safety section in the Guide to Safe Scouting was changed

to read as follows:

“APPROPRIATE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT IS REQUIRED FOR ALL ACTIVITIES.

THIS INCLUDES THE RECOMMENDED USE OF HELMETS FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS

ENGAGED IN WINTER SPORTS SUCH AS SLEDDING AND OTHER SLIDING DEVICES. THE

USE OF HELMETS IS REQUIRED FOR THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES: DOWNHILL SKIING,

SNOWBOARDING, AND OPERATION OF SNOWMOBILES (FULL-FACE HELMETS).”

The change can only be found at this time in the electronic version of
Guide to Safe Scouting. The

updated printed version should be available in January 2011.

The
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends the following safety guidelines to

improve sledding safety:

�� Parents or adults must supervise children at all times while they are sledding.

�� Sled only in designated areas free of fixed objects such as trees, posts, and fences.

�� Do not sled on slopes that end in a street, drop-off, parking lot, river, or pond.

�� All participants must sit in a forward-facing position, steering with their feet or a rope tied to the

steering handles of the sled. No one should sled headfirst down a slope.

�� To protect from injury, it is important to wear helmets, gloves, and layers of clothing.

�� Do not sit/slide on plastic sheets or other materials that can be pierced by objects on the ground.

�� Use a sled with runners and a steering mechanism, which is safer than toboggans or snow disks.

�� Sled in well-lighted areas when choosing evening activities.

�� Individuals with pre-existing neurological problems may be at a higher risk for injury.Please remember The Sweet 16 of BSA Safety, which embodies good judgment and common sense for all

Scouting activities:

1. Qualified Supervision

2. Physical Fitness

3. Buddy System

4. Safe Area or Course

5. Equipment Selection and Maintenance

6. Personal Safety Equipment

7. Safety Procedures and Policies

8. Skill Level Limits

9. Weather Check

10. Planning

11. Communication

12. Permits and Notices

13. First-Aid Resources

14. Applicable Laws

15. CPR Resources

16. Discipline

The District of Columbia requires helmets for any person under age 16 while using roller skates, a

skateboard, sled, coaster, toy vehicle, sidewalk bicycle, scooter, or any similar device. Massachusetts is

considering legislation that would require children under 12 to wear a helmet during sledding,

snowboarding, and ice-skating activities.

J:\RISK\Health and Safety\Winter Sports Safety\Health and Safety Winter1.doc

 

Winter Sports Health & Safety Update of 2010 (PDF)


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